Ski Selector

Welcome to the new website! Here's a guide on filtering out all the skis we have available to find the best one for you.

The first step is to get to the main ski page. Towards the top of the webpage, hold your cursor (mouse) over the "SKI" tab where a drop down menu will appear showing options to select Men's, Women's, Kids, Touring, Snowblades. Select what kind of ski you're aiming to get.

When you've made your selection, you'll be brought to a page showing skis of varying sizes and designs that fall within that category. To help narrow down the choices, on the left-hand side of the listings, you'll see many options to filter the results further by "Ability Level", "Height", "Terrain Type", etc. Some of these are straight forward but here's a bit more info. on each selection.

Ability Level: This will help filter the skis out by what would be appropriate for your ability level. The lower the ability level, the easier the ski will be to handle at lower speeds and to learn the basics on. They tend to be softer and lighter. The higher the ability level, you'll get a more aggressively designed ski that will be designed to handle rougher terrain and more aggressive skiing. The best way to determine ability level is to look at what kind of slopes you'll be spending most of your time on. For example, if you ski mainly on Green runs, you'll be a beginner, Blue runs, intermediate, Black runs, advanced and so on.

Height: This will help determine which length ski would be suitable for you based on your height. Here is a ski sizing chart for reference Keep in mind these are only averages. If you personally prefer a longer or shorter ski, its best to take that into account with your choices. If you have a personal preference as to size, you can use the "Ski Size Range" filter option. To put it simply, a shorter ski is easier to handle and to learn on but is less stable at higher speeds (better suited for those just learning or looking to take it easy). A longer ski is harder to handle but is more stable at higher speeds (more suitable for advanced skiers).

Terrain Type: Just as it sounds, this will filter out the skis by what kind of terrain you aim to shred on and what kind of skiing you aim to do the most of. "All mountain" are for the most versatile skis with a great balance of carving and ability to rip off piste. "Carving" are skis that are designed for the hard pack and mainly are for arcing awesome turns. "Park" are twin-tipped skis and while most are designed for just the rails and jumps, some make for great all mountain skis as well. "Powder" skis are the widest of the bunch and are made to float you through the softest and deepest snow.

Waist Width Range: If you have a preference to how wide you want the waist (middle) of your ski to be, this will be the filtering option for you. A wider waist means it will take more effort for edge-to-edge transferring, but it allows for better float in softer/deeper snow and for charging through chopped up conditions. A ski with a skinnier waist will lose some versatility but generally will excel at carving.

Price: You can drag both ends of the bar to create a price range for how much or little you're looking to spend on a new pair of sticks.

Includes Ski Bindings: As the name suggests, you can filter out all options that come with bindings included in the price, or just the ski by itself.

Manufacturer: If you have brand loyalty, this is a way to only display skis made by a certain manufacturer. Keep in mind all brands make solid skis now-a-days and in most cases the model ski is more important than the manufacturer.

Color: By selecting a certain color, you'll be shown every ski that includes that color in the design of the skis.

Model Year: If a certain production year tickles your fancy, this will filter out skis made for that season. In the northern hemisphere, the ski season extends from one year into the next (2014-2015 winter season for example). If a ski is labeled as a 2015 model, it was made for the 2014-2015 winter season.